MDHHS Urges Residents To Get Tested For STDs

MDHHS Urges Residents To Get Tested For STDs

Michi­gan Depart­ment of Health and Human Ser­vices have urged its sex­u­al­ly-active res­i­dents to get reg­u­lar STD test­ing after they’ve seen an increase in the num­ber of sex­u­al­ly trans­mit­ted dis­eases hit the state.

In the 2017 Michi­gan Annu­al STD Sum­ma­ry Report, there was a rise in syphilis, gon­or­rhea and chlamy­dia, which mir­rors the nation­al trends not­ed in the sur­veil­lance report the Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion released. Where STDs were on the decline, they are now ris­ing at an alarm­ing rate.

Since 2008, Michi­gan saw up to 50,000 cas­es a year in chlamy­dia, but it rose to 51,000 in 2017. Gon­or­rhea cas­es were drop­ping between 2008 and 2014 but rose 60 per­cent in the last three years. A 20 per­cent increase was not­ed in 2017. Syphilis rates dropped 25 per­cent after an out­break in 2013 but increased by 28 per­cent in 2017.

Most of the cas­es are being report­ed by African men and women, teenagers and gay or bisex­u­al men.

STD symp­toms for men, which include dis­charge, sores, rash­es or burn­ing while pee­ing, often resolve them­selves with­out treat­ment inter­ven­tion. How­ev­er, they are still infect­ed and can spread the dis­ease to oth­er peo­ple. Most females have no out­ward symptoms.

Antibi­otics can cure all three dis­eases, but most go undi­ag­nosed and untreat­ed, which could lead to even more health prob­lems such as ectopic preg­nan­cy, infer­til­i­ty, still­birth and an increase in HIV infec­tions.

MDHHS Chief Exec­u­tive Dr. Eden Wells said the major­i­ty of infect­ed peo­ple do not know they are infect­ed and pass their dis­ease onto oth­ers. For the STD trans­mis­sion rate to slow down, sex­u­al­ly active indi­vid­u­als are encour­aged to get reg­u­lar screen­ings. Wells said peo­ple are urged to speak with their doc­tor or oth­er health­care providers about test­ing or to get treat­ment from a local health depart­ment clinic.

MDHHS works in col­lab­o­ra­tion with health care providers, local health depart­ments, com­mu­ni­ty-based orga­ni­za­tions and phar­ma­cists to prop­er­ly screen and treat peo­ple to pro­tect their health and to stop the spread of STDs.

Wells said it’s impor­tant peo­ple under­stand the risk, abstain from sex, reduce their num­ber of part­ners and always use con­doms to slow down the spread of these diseases. 


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