Doctors Warned Of Reemergence Of Nearly Extinct STD

Doctors Warned Of Reemergence Of Nearly Extinct STD

Pub­lic health offi­cials through­out the coun­try are alert­ing physi­cians about a not-so-com­mon STD mak­ing its way across the coun­try again.

The sex­u­al­ly-trans­mit­ted dis­ease, lym­phogran­u­lo­ma venereum or LGV, has not been seen so much since the 1920s. It’s a type of the more com­mon Chlamy­dia that can lead to gen­i­talia and colon scar­ring. If untreat­ed, it can cause swelling of the groin’s lymph glands, which could burst.

There have been ser­al report­ed cas­es in San Fran­cis­co, which prompt­ed wor­ries that it could spread.

Van­der­bilt Uni­ver­si­ty Med­ical Cen­ter School of Med­i­cine Chair­man of Pre­ven­tive Med­i­cine Dr. William Schaffn­er said doc­tor must be mind­ful of the symp­toms LGV shows to pro­vide infect­ed per­sons imme­di­ate treat­ment to stop the bac­te­ria from doing fur­ther damage.

He said it was com­mon­ly seen in the 1920 and 1930s, but through diag­no­sis and treat­ment, it was about elim­i­nat­ed from the states. Due to the abil­i­ty to trav­el to and from var­i­ous places, peo­ple are catch­ing the dis­ease and bring­ing it back.

Schaffner’s warn­ing and the CDC’s alert was issued back in Octo­ber 2017, with a warn­ing to doc­tors that the bac­te­ria could make its way to the states. The San Fran­cis­co cas­es is a tes­ta­ment to that warning.

Although the dis­ease affects both men and women, peo­ple who are more like­ly to catch is are ones who have anal sex. There are no out­ward signs of the dis­ease, which is why doc­tors must be vig­il about the disease’s reemergence.

Schaffn­er said most doc­tors today have not seen an LGV case before, and being that it’s such an odd STD, they could mis­take it for Chron’s dis­ease. Most symp­toms begin three weeks after expo­sure, usu­al­ly with ulcers in the gen­i­tal region. A month after the expo­sure, they may expe­ri­ence swelling and pain in their lymph nodes around the groin area. They may have a fever and not feel good overall.

Oth­er signs of the LGV STD includes mucus or blood in the stool, anal itch­ing, cramps while hav­ing a bow­el move­ment, colon and rec­tum inflam­ma­tion and gas­troin­testi­nal bleed­ing. LGV-infect­ed indi­vid­u­als will need to take three weeks’ worth of antibi­otics rather than the stan­dard one dose that is giv­en to peo­ple with chlamydia


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