Condoms Have New Design That Could Help Lower STD Transmission Rates

Condoms Have New Design That Could Help Lower STD Transmission Rates

Con­dom designs have changed very lit­tle in the 50 years since their incep­tion – notwith­stand­ing adding col­ors and fla­vors, of course. How­ev­er, this could change with the help of researchers from Boston Uni­ver­si­ty who announced the cre­ation of a self-lubri­cat­ing condom.

This con­dom may help to stop unwant­ed preg­nan­cies and the spread of sex­u­al­ly trans­mit­ted infec­tions such as chlamy­dia, gon­or­rhea and syphilis.

Col­lege of Arts & Sci­ences chem­istry pro­fes­sor Mark Grin­staff said slow­ing and stop­ping the spread of STDs like HIV is extreme­ly impor­tant. He, along with an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary research team, announced the condom’s new design in the Roy­al Soci­ety Open Sci­ence journal.

Grin­staff said that was the biggest rea­son to change the condom’s design.

The con­dom has yet to be test­ed but was giv­en a touch test. Indi­vid­u­als were giv­en three kinds of latex – stan­dard with per­son­al lubri­cant added, stan­dard, non-lubri­cat­ed and self-lubri­cat­ed. 85 per­cent of those who par­tic­i­pat­ed felt the mate­r­i­al of the new con­dom and said it slip­perier than the oth­er condoms.

Grin­staff said peo­ple tend to like that fea­ture. Peo­ple who don’t like using con­doms said they would con­sid­er using a self-lubri­cat­ing con­dom. About 9 in 10 par­tic­i­pants said they would buy the self-lubri­cat­ing con­dom of the stan­dard type.

The self-lubri­cat­ing con­dom is sim­i­lar in looks to the latex con­dom – the improve­ment comes in how it feels when touch­ing it. Many sil­i­cone-based lubri­cants in con­doms tend to repel mois­ture, are often messy and tacky. How­ev­er, the new con­doms con­tain poly­mers that attract bod­i­ly flu­ids and water, trap­ping them on its sur­face. In essence, it keeps the con­dom lubri­cant and offers a slip­pery sen­sa­tion dur­ing sex­u­al activity.

With this type of con­dom, there’s no need to add arti­fi­cial lubri­cant in the mid­dle of sex.

Over three years of research and close to 1,000 for­mu­las test­ed, and Grin­staff and his team came up with the per­fect com­bi­na­tion of lubri­cant and latex.


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