Chlamydia Trachomatis Is A Common STD That Doesn’t Discriminate From Young Or Old, Male or Female

Chlamydia Trachomatis Is A Common STD That Doesn’t Discriminate From Young Or Old, Male or Female

Chlamy­dia tra­choma­tis is the bac­te­ria that caus­es the com­mon STD infec­tion known as chlamy­dia – a dis­ease that doesn’t dis­crim­i­nate against men or women. The virus spread through sex­u­al con­tact such as oral, anal or vagi­nal sex with a per­son who is infect­ed. Preg­nant moth­ers with the dis­ease can pass the dis­ease onto their babies.

The major­i­ty of peo­ple don’t know they have the STD because it has no out­ward symp­toms. Accord­ing to var­i­ous research, 50 per­cent of men and near­ly 80 per­cent of women suf­fer from no symp­toms, which means they pass the dis­ease to oth­ers with­out real­iz­ing it.

What Are Some Symp­toms To Watch For?

A huge issue with this STD is that it doesn’t gen­er­ate any imme­di­ate symp­toms, lay­ing unde­tect­ed for weeks after the ini­tial trans­mis­sion. For that rea­son, it can lead to com­pli­ca­tions. Even with­out symp­toms, they still pass the dis­ease onto oth­ers. Again, symp­toms don’t come on until weeks after a per­son has had the infection.

Women with chlamy­dia may expe­ri­ence fre­quent chron­ic pelvic or stom­ach pains, abnor­mal vagi­nal dis­charge, blood in their urine, urgent­ly need­ing to pee even if already gone and burn­ing in the vagi­nal area.

Men with chlamy­dia may expe­ri­ence a watery or cloudy-like dis­charge from their penis, swollen tes­ti­cles or dif­fi­cul­ty peeing. 

New­borns with chlamy­dia could expe­ri­ence both con­junc­tivi­tis and pneumonia. 

What Are Some Of The Com­pli­ca­tions That Exist With Chlamydia 

For women, untreat­ed infec­tions could cause major long-term health prob­lems like pelvic inflam­ma­to­ry dis­ease, infer­til­i­ty due to scar­ring of the fal­lop­i­an tubes or ectopic pregnancies. 

Untreat­ed chlamy­dia in men could lead to gen­i­tal scar­ring, low sperm count and oth­er health problems.

New­borns with chlamy­dia are at risk of los­ing their sight or devel­op­ing com­plex pneumonia. 

What Tests Are Done To Deter­mine You Have Chlamydia?

Doc­tors will order tests to deter­mine if you are, in fact, infect­ed with this STD. Women can do either a urine test or have a swab tak­en from their vagi­na or cervix. Men will need to do a urine test. The treat­ment is antibi­ot­ic medication. 

The Right Course of Treatment

Chlamy­dia is cur­able with a dose of antibi­otics – a spe­cial class of them. Patients are urged to take the entire pre­scrip­tion to clear up and cure the infec­tion. When tak­en as direct­ed, the infec­tion will clear up and reduce your chances of more complications. 

Infect­ed indi­vid­u­als should avoid sex­u­al activ­i­ty until the infec­tion is cleared to avoid rein­fec­tions or spread­ing it to their part­ner. It’s also advised to get anoth­er chlamy­dia test with­in three months to ensure the infec­tion is gone.

Since chlamy­dia is spread through unpro­tect­ed sex, the doc­tor may decide that you need screen­ing for oth­er STDs.

How Can You Pre­vent The Spread Of STDs?

If you have anal or oral sex with an infect­ed part­ner, you could suf­fer from a rec­tal or throat infec­tion, which could cause pain and mucus or pus dis­charge. The only sure­fire way to avoid becom­ing infect­ed with this com­mon STD is to use con­doms dur­ing any type of sex­u­al activ­i­ty. You can also do the following:

  • Abstain from sex 
  • Stay faith­ful to your partne 
  • Reg­u­lar­ly use condoms 

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