4 Possible Treatment Options for Chancroid STD Bacteria

4 Possible Treatment Options for Chancroid STD Bacteria

Sex­u­al­ly trans­mit­ted dis­ease Chan­croid is caused by the Haemophilus ducreyi, a small bac­te­ria that can lead to gen­i­tal ulcer­a­tion syn­drome. This syn­drome can also cause bubo for­ma­tion and lymph nodes inflammation. 

Diag­no­sis for chan­croid isn’t fast or sen­si­tive, but a doc­tor should begin treat­ment right away if they sus­pect their patient has the dis­ease. Many peo­ple are unaware of this STD or that it could be a poten­tial fac­tor for HIV trans­mis­sion (human immun­od­e­fi­cien­cy virus). 

The Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion said chancroid’s treat­ment could entail four dif­fer­ent types of treatment:

  • 1 intra­mus­cu­lar dose 250mg of ceftriaxone 
  • 1 dose of azithromycin 
  • 3 days of 500mg oral ciprofloxacin (two times a day) 
  • 7 days of 500mg oral ery­thromycin (three times a day)

Both cef­tri­ax­one and azithromycin have an advan­tage because they are sin­gle dosage pre­scrip­tion, but the oth­er meth­ods are nec­es­sary for peo­ple who have HIV. Ciprofloxacin should not be pre­scribed to women preg­nant or lac­tat­ing as well any­one under the age of 18. If treat­ment is suc­cess­ful, there will be less ten­der­ness, no puru­lence with some rem­nants of ulcers after the ini­tial treat­ment. Uncir­cum­cised men and peo­ple with HIV may have slow­er heal­ing times.

The World Health Orga­ni­za­tion has sug­gest­ed a broad syn­dromic approach to treat­ing gen­i­tal ulcers. This kind of man­age­ment is offered to areas where there is lit­tle to no lab sup­port, and treat­ment is found­ed on the local epi­demi­o­log­i­cal pat­terns and those with antibi­ot­ic sensitivity.

The key premise to the syn­dromic approach is to treat suf­fers dur­ing the first vis­it using var­i­ous antimi­cro­bials and cov­er the prob­a­ble eti­o­log­i­cal infec­tious agents around the area. It doesn’t elim­i­nate the need for lab work.

The approach has gar­nered more suc­cess than trust­ing algo­rithms and clin­i­cal diag­no­sis. It’s also been used in cer­tain coun­tries of sub-Saha­ran Africa.

What Efforts Are Being Made To Pre­vent A Chan­croid Outbreak?

In an effort to keep an out­break of chan­croid from occur­ring, there have been numer­ous inter­ven­tions devel­oped that tar­get com­mer­cial sex work­ers, rea­son­able syn­dromic man­age­ment of the ulcers and peer inter­ven­tions to ensure high lev­els of pre­ven­tive attitudes.

Still, more inter­ven­tions could be con­sid­ered such as more afford­able diag­nos­tics and post-expo­sure male hygiene.

Researchers have yet to devel­op a vac­cine for chancroid.


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